West Pomeranian

West Pomeranian Region is situated in the north-west Poland on the South-west coast of the Baltic Sea.

skane region

It is the least populated area in Poland (population density is 74 people per 1 km2, much below than national average). It is the fifth largest region in Poland and covers an area of 22.9 thousand km2 (7.3% of total area of Poland) and ranks eleventh in population with 1,694,300 people (4.4% of Poland’s population). 70% of inhabitants live in cities, which makes Zachodniopomorskie the third most urbanised region in Poland. One third of its area is covered by forests with post-glacial moraine hills and lakes which give Zachodniopomorskie unique landscape virtues. From the west, the region borders with German federal states of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern and Brandeburg, from the south and south-east Polish regions of Lubuskie, Wielkopolskie and Pomorskie to the north-east.

The capital of Zachodniopomorskie is Szczecin, situated on the Oder River, 153 km from Berlin and 96 km from the Baltic coast. Its population is 414 000 people. It is the largest city in the Polish-German border area. In its history, Szczecin changed hands. It belonged to Poland, Denmark, Sweden, Prussia, and in the Napoleon era to France. During WWII the city was severely destroyed. The architectural arrangement of the city centre is similar to that in Paris, since in 1880 the city was redeveloped according to plans by Georges-Eugene Haussmann. Apart from being an administrative centre, Szczecin is the cultural centre of the region and a home to several universities. It is also the largest regional economic centre. The city is a large sea and river port as well as the largest Polish shipbuilding and maritime education centre.

Szczecin is an important transport node. Situated on the cross roads of E65 and Via Hanseatica, the latter planned to be upgraded to an express road leading along the Baltic coast. The Port of Szczecin has waterway links with Berlin and a system of inland waterways leading to Western Europe. All modes of transport can be found in Szczecin, therefore, the city has excellent conditions for becoming a multimodal transport centre. The Szczecin and Świnoujście seaports, together with a smaller but growing port in Police, create one of the most important port complexes in the Baltic Sea region. A ferry terminal which services both passenger and cargo traffic from Denmark and Sweden is situated in Świnoujście. It is also an indispensable element of the infrastructure which comprises the European Route E65.

The location of Zachodniopomorskie Region in the south-western part of Baltic Sea Region, on the estuary of Oder River, determines its development. The economic development of the region is based on maritime economy, sea transport, industry, agriculture and tourism. To a large extent, the industry serves maritime economy, and many companies are situated in the region because of its coastal location. Apart from several shipyards and multiple businesses cooperating with them, other industries include paper production, wood processing, chemical production, food processing, and power generation. Coastal tourism, and to a lesser degree lake and spa tourism, generate considerable income in the region. Prospects for further development of regional economy include the use of geothermal resources, production of bio-fuel and development of enterprise and tourism with the help of Central European Transport Corridor infrastructure.The Zachodniopomorskie Region is situated in the north-west Poland on the South-west coast of the Baltic Sea. It is the least populated area in Poland (population density is 74 people per 1 km2, much below than national average). It is the fifth largest region in Poland and covers an area of 22.9 thousand km2 (7.3% of total area of Poland) and ranks eleventh in population with 1,694,300 people (4.4% of Poland’s population). 70% of inhabitants live in cities, which makes Zachodniopomorskie the third most urbanised region in Poland. One third of its area is covered by forests with post-glacial moraine hills and lakes which give Zachodniopomorskie unique landscape virtues. From the west, the region borders with German federal states of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern and Brandeburg, from the south and south-east Polish regions of Lubuskie, Wielkopolskie and Pomorskie to the north-east.

The capital of Zachodniopomorskie is Szczecin, situated on the Oder River, 153 km from Berlin and 96 km from the Baltic coast. Its population is 414 000 people. It is the largest city in the Polish-German border area. In its history, Szczecin changed hands. It belonged to Poland, Denmark, Sweden, Prussia, and in the Napoleon era to France. During WWII the city was severely destroyed. The architectural arrangement of the city centre is similar to that in Paris, since in 1880 the city was redeveloped according to plans by Georges-Eugene Haussmann. Apart from being an administrative centre, Szczecin is the cultural centre of the region and a home to several universities. It is also the largest regional economic centre. The city is a large sea and river port as well as the largest Polish shipbuilding and maritime education centre.

Szczecin is an important transport node. Situated on the cross roads of E65 and Via Hanseatica, the latter planned to be upgraded to an express road leading along the Baltic coast. The Port of Szczecin has waterway links with Berlin and a system of inland waterways leading to Western Europe. All modes of transport can be found in Szczecin, therefore, the city has excellent conditions for becoming a multimodal transport centre. The Szczecin and Świnoujście seaports, together with a smaller but growing port in Police, create one of the most important port complexes in the Baltic Sea region. A ferry terminal which services both passenger and cargo traffic from Denmark and Sweden is situated in Świnoujście. It is also an indispensable element of the infrastructure which comprises the European Route E65.

The location of Zachodniopomorskie Region in the south-western part of Baltic Sea Region, on the estuary of Oder River, determines its development. The economic development of the region is based on maritime economy, sea transport, industry, agriculture and tourism. To a large extent, the industry serves maritime economy, and many companies are situated in the region because of its coastal location. Apart from several shipyards and multiple businesses cooperating with them, other industries include paper production, wood processing, chemical production, food processing, and power generation. Coastal tourism, and to a lesser degree lake and spa tourism, generate considerable income in the region. Prospects for further development of regional economy include the use of geothermal resources, production of bio-fuel and development of enterprise and tourism with the help of Central European Transport Corridor infrastructure.

Marshal's Office of Zachodniopomorskie Voivodeship

Gallery

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